Preface
Preface

Preface

While shoulder instability is a common diagnosis, optimal management remains challenging despite improvements in evaluation and surgical techniques. The surgeon-clinician must be well-equipped with knowledge and understanding of the equilibrium between motion and stability to maximize the surgical outcome and to prevent risks of recurrence.

This special edition on anterior shoulder instability contains articles from worldwide authorities to provide a comprehensive overview of the pathoanatomy and clinical decision making for the management of this common condition. Debski et al. explain the biomechanics of stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint. MacDonald et al. provide a summary of natural history and epidemiology after first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. In the last decade much attention has been devoted to addressing bone loss with shoulder instability. Lo et al. explain how to best assess for bony attrition.

Additionally, one of the goals of this issue is to present the various innovative methods and techniques of treating shoulder instability by the world’s foremost experts. In addition to well described classics such as the open Bankart, open Latarjet, and arthroscopic stabilization procedures described by Arciero et al., Walch et al., and Lin et al., respectively, more recent techniques are included in this edition including the arthroscopic Latarjet by Boileau et al. Furthermore, Provencher et al. provided an overview of their technique using distal tibial osteochondral allograft. Tokish et al. explained their method of augmenting the glenoid using the distal clavicle autograft. Moreover, salvage procedures such as iliac crest autograft technique are outlined by Warner et al.

Finally, rehabilitation and return to sports after surgical stabilization is outlined by Irrgang and his colleagues. It is our pleasure and honor to have the opportunity to assemble this collection of articles from esteemed faculty. We hope that this issue will stimulate interest and discussion among the readers, and most importantly result in improvement of patient care.


Acknowledgements

Dr. Shin and Dr. Lin would like to thank all the authors included in this special anterior shoulder instability edition for their contribution to this journal and to the field of orthopaedic surgery.


Albert Lin
Jason J. Shin

Albert Lin, MD

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, USA.
(Email: lina2@upmc.edu)

Jason J. Shin, MD

University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
(Email: jasonjwshin@gmail.com)

doi: 10.21037/aoj.2017.12.07

Conflicts of Interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

doi: 10.21037/aoj.2017.12.07
Cite this article as: Lin A. Preface. Ann Joint 2018;3:5.

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